Photography, Useful

Wild garlic

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When you say spring all I can think about it is wild garlic. Fresh from the garden or the forest, these leaves are my favorite for a pesto. Forget about basil. Go bold, go wild and make a wild garlic pesto.

It is also known as ramsons, buckrams, broad-leaved garlic, wood garlic, bear leek, or bear’s garlic.

I use the leaves in salad, soups, rice or stews. They look similar to a poisonous plant, so be careful. If you don’t know it very well go in a market and buy it.

If you like garlic, you can also use the leaves in green juices or smoothies. You can eat the flowers too. Wild garlic is at peak in April, so enjoy it as much as you can. They will be gone by June.

When you have fresh wild garlic forget about the old bulbs. Use it in everything. The taste is more delicate.

Wild garlic is antibacterial, antiseptic, antibiotic and also it helps in reducing blood pressure. It contains vitamins A and C, calcium, iron, phosphorus, sodium and copper.

If you want a real taste of spring taste wild garlic. You won’t be disappointed.

You can find my recipe for pesto here: Wild garlic pesto.

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48 thoughts on “Wild garlic”

  1. Delicious – we have wild garlic growing in the garden, still a bit small yet, but I added shredded leaves for Wild Garlic butter prawns 😍 Will give the pesto a go when it grows a bit more

  2. I’ve never seen wild garlic here in FL. Were have so many soil bugs here I guess you can’t grow them. I will look at some of the Fresh Market type stores and se if they have any. It sounds very interesting for a different pesto.

  3. There’s a patch of wild garlic in my garden – I planted it about 10 years ago and right now it’s coming up a treat. You might want to warn people that while the leaves are very mild in flavour, the flowers are extremely strong.

    Also, the reason for being careful in your identification is that lily of the valley leaves look very similar (at least if they’re not in flower), come up at the same time, and they are poisonous.

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