Photography, Useful

Red currant berries

red currant

These shiny little berries grow low on bushes, hanging from the branches like rows of miniature gems. They are sweet enough to be eaten raw or you can sprinkled them with plenty of sugar. They have a high vitamin C content, and go well with both other berries and fruits.

Red currant berries are known as β€œsuper fruits” as they have naturally high antioxidant capacity.

Red currants can be eaten fresh, cooked or dried. They can also be frozen for long term preservation and use. Red currants’ natural tart flavor and astringency is enhanced with sweetening via sugar, honey, agave nectar, and of course through cooking. Red currants add flavor and texture to sauces, liqueurs, jams, jellies and syrups. Complimentary pairings include baking spices such as cinnamon and nutmeg, vanilla, cream, clove, citrus fruits, tomatoes, juniper, ginger, strawberries, huckleberries, stone fruit such as peaches and cherries, lemon verbena, game meats, pork, shellfish, grilled steak and herbs such as basil and mint.

 

 

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71 thoughts on “Red currant berries”

  1. Reminds me of England and my Nana. She used to take us to the Romford market. We’d try all the English summer fruit. But red currents remind me of her the most.

  2. Beautiful photo! I eat these frozen, but haven’t actually ever seen them growing anywhere. Must go searching, as I do love a bit of foraging…

  3. Lovely pics! Just wanted to say thanks for spending more time at the table today; I’m glad you were there. I love currants, but they’re not widely available in Colorado (USA) except in the dried form–and sometimes not even then. At a quick glance, I can’t tell where you are. UK? Scotland? Lots of currants in Scotland. Happy Tuesday to you and all you love:)

      1. Thanks. Just out of curiosity, do you have black currants, too?? We had them in the garden at my mom and dad’s house near Chicago, Illinois. Beautiful….

  4. We’ve always had red currents (3 bushes) growing at the side of the house when I was living at home. My mother told me “To get the most currents, you need to snip of the top canopy of broad leaves about 6 inches from the top so the sun can get at the currents to ripen them.” You will have a bumper crop. You have to know when to snip. It is right after the berries have formed on the bush.

  5. I had these the other day in a frozen berry mix and couldn’t for the life of me remember what they were called!! So I was very happy to re-learn the name of my once-favourite fruit!

  6. These are the berries that my friends and I would go picking and pretend we were on one of those adventures and this was our only source of food we’d find. Totally brings me back to childhood.

  7. Love these! I’m trying to grow some but so far no fruit after two years. I’m thinking perhaps I need two bushes even though when I bought it I was sure it said self pollinating.

  8. I love your posts like these where you explore and ingredient. I always learn something new, and you have a way of making everything sound delicious and look beautiful.

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